An Ode to Japanese Fabric

I just raed a really great article  on Japanese culture, history, and japanese fabric.  It is written by Gary Bloom, owner of an online store Kyoto Collection.

This is a really good source to help you get into the mind of a Japanese. Here is a short cart of it….

“I started buying and selling new and vintage fabric soon after I made Kyoto my home in 1998 and I’m still just as enthralled by the city in general and textiles in particular all these years later.

I hadn’t planned on making fabric my focus before I got here, but it didn’t take long for me to get hooked on Kyoto’s famed monthly temple markets, rousing myself before dawn on market days to go treasure hunting and practice some Japanese in the process.

I had a second hand extendable camping backpack that I’d bought with outdoor adventuring in mind that I instead requisitioned for use on market mornings.  Though I never have gotten around to the camping, that pack has more than earned its keep, stuffed full like a fisherman’s creel by mid-morning on so many occasions with kimono and other finds!

There are many angles from which we can look at this fascinating world-material and how it’s woven, dyeing techniques, motifs, and the way in which a given fabric was used by its owner.

Here, rather than try to write an encyclopedic overview, I’d like to explore the world of Japanese fabric in more general terms that put it in a larger context and give a sense of the dynamism that makes it such a rewarding and sometimes addictive pursuit.”

Get on over there and take a look at it!

Growing the Juniper Bonsai

Juniper Bonsai are one of the most versatile styles of bonsai that you can grow. There are a few things that you should keep in mind when you tend to a juniper bonsai. This type of bonsai is not an indoor plant.

If you have received a juniper bonsai as a gift, or you are interested in growing your own from a seed or seedling, you will want to keep pruning and wiring supplies on hand, as these are the most common tools you will use with your juniper bonsai. Careful pruning of new buds and excess branches and needles will help improve your design of the tree. Remember, wear gloves when working with junipers, for the needles can cause allergic reactions and irritation to the skin.

Juniper bonsai can be purchased at online stores or at local nurseries.

Juniper bonsai are extremely common, as this type of tree is so easy to care for and train. Because of the fast grow rate, many bonsai nurseries will keep this hardy tree in stock, as it can be trained much faster than other species used in bonsai.

The leading cause of death in juniper bonsai is that people try to keep this pine indoors. It should be kept outdoors whenever possible, and only brought in during the harshest parts of winter or during snow storms that would suffocate the plant. Once the extremely bad weather has past, your juniper bonsai should be sent back outside so it can remain in dormancy.

Unlike delicate tropical plants, the juniper bonsai has grown for hundreds of years in conditions most plants would not like. Because of this, it needs winter dormancy in order to be able to repair itself from any damage it took in the growing season.

Ficus Bonsai – A Traditional Design

Like many plants, ficus bonsai trees require a period of dormancy, where the plant is given time to recover from the blooming and growing season. During this period, the plant is kept in slightly colder temperatures than when it is standardly blooming. This can be done indoors, so long as the temperature near the plant remains cold enough that the tree does not come out of dormancy.

It should be remembered that many fruits from ficus bonsai are not edible. While there are some species of ficus bonsai that can produce edible fruits, it is typically suggested against eating any fruit that might grow from your bonsai. In many cases, especially in dwarf ficus trees, the tree will never produce fruit, and fruits that are produced are too small for consumption.

Training ficus bonsai can be done by bonsai growers of all experience levels, which is one of the reasons this style of tree is very popular among growers. As the ficus bonsai group contains many varieties of figs, there are species that are harder to care for, and some that are easier to care for.

If you are looking for a traditional bonsai, the ficus bonsai may be what you are looking for. Suitable for the standard bonsai design, as well as root over rock styles, the ficus bonsai is a versatile, hardy tree that is relatively easy to care for.

Never eat a fruit from a ficus bonsai unless you have confirmation that it is not poisonous.

It is possible for ficus bonsai to be maintained year round, although this can damage some species of ficus. If you are planning on keeping your ficus bonsai in full leaf year round, you will need to ensure that the plant does not fall into dormancy.